15 October 2009

New York Philharmonic receives $2.4 million to digitize the orchestra’s archives

New York Philharmonic receives $2.4 million grant from the Leon Levy Foundation to digitize 1.3 million pages of the orchestra’s archives.

Leonard Bernstein’s marked conducting scores will be first material released, according to www.leonardbernstein.com.

“I’ve been here 25 years, and this is life-changing,” said Barbara Haws, the Philharmonic’s archivist to The New York Times. “Access is one thing, but since we’re digitizing these documents, you’ll also have the ability to see details you’ve never been able to see: a score marked by Mahler in 1909 and used by Bernstein in 1959, a conductor making marks in the heat of the moment, some old and faded, can now be enlarged, which is just magical. On a single page there are multiple experiences reflected over time.”

A tad off topic, but this is Bernstein conducting Wagner:

08 October 2009

The Road to the LA Ring

According to the Los Angeles Opera, the first "Road to the Ring" events have set a path to the Festival and garnered enthusiasm from participants across the region.

Search lights brought people from miles away to view Charles Sherman's Ring of Inclusion sculpture on Sunset Boulevard August 28. In mid-September, artists from the California Art Club gathered downtown at California Plaza and in Pasadena at Maranantha High School to paint models enacting scenes from the Ring in plein air.

In anticipation of the September 26 opening of LA Opera's first-ever production of Siegfried, the Speakers Bureau has been on the road lecturing about the opera at public libraries throughout Los Angeles. James Conlon, LA Opera's Richard Seaver Music Director, discussed Wagner's monumental work at the Broad Stage on September 24. Achim Freyer, Ring Director/Designer, conversed with journalist Matthew Gurewitsch at the Goethe Institut on September 29th.